EndUserSharePoint.com: Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards – Contact Information Module

On Demand ScreenCastA seventh module has been added to the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards screencast series. You will have to scroll in the display interface to view the new module.

One of the simplest things you can do for your End Users is to include the site manager contact information in the top, right corner of the entrance page to each site. In this module, we’ll examine how to use a Content Editor  Web Part to create a resuable contact display.

Seven (7) modules are now available in the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards series, for a total of 30 minutes of content. I would appreciate it if you would spread the word by embedding the video player on your site. Thanks. — Mark

Current Modules in Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards:

  1. Overview
  2. Graphics Menu
  3. Random Quote Generator
  4. My Task Assignments
  5. The Video Wall
  6. The Workshop Calendar
  7. Contact Information

This is a continuing series of screencast based upon the online workshop, Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards, given on September 16, 2008.

I will be offering a hands-on, live online workshop to actually implement each of the solutions in your WSS or MOSS environment. The workshop will include preconfigured web parts, resources for implementation and a SharePoint sandbox for testing out the solutions.

Keep and eye on the Weekly Newsletter for announcement of the workshop.

EndUserSharePoint.com: Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards – The Workshop Calendar Module

On Demand ScreenCastA sixth module has been added to the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards screencast series. You will have to scroll in the display interface to view the new module.

When a list or library is created in SharePoint, a web part is created for that list or library. A calendar is nothing more than a nicely formatted list. This module, The Workshop Calendar, shows a configured a calendar web part in the entrance page dashboard.

Six (6) modules are now available in the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards series, for a total of 27 minutes of content. I would appreciate it if you would spread the word by embedding the video player on your site. Thanks. — Mark

Current Modules in Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards:

  1. Overview
  2. Graphics Menu
  3. Random Quote Generator
  4. My Task Assignments
  5. The Video Wall
  6. The Workshop Calendar

This is a continuing series of screencast based upon the online workshop, Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards, given on September 16, 2008.

I will be offering a hands-on, live online workshop to actually implement each of the solutions in your WSS or MOSS environment. The workshop will include preconfigured web parts, resources for implementation and a SharePoint sandbox for testing out the solutions.

Keep and eye on the Weekly Newsletter for announcement of the workshop.

EndUserSharePoint.com: How come SharePoint sites looks so geeky?

It always bothers me when I see Out-of-the-Box SharePoint sites because they look so geeky. The problem is that when first implementing, everyone is so concerned with content, they crank things up without knowing the modification capabilities that can be done to the interface.

Let’s say you’ve got your libraries and lists setup, your calendar’s running fine, people are communicating, collaborating, utilizing SharePoint to their heart’s desire.  You’re looking for something else to do.

Ian Morrish at WSS Demo has decided to create his own ranking system for the top 100 best looking SharePoint sites. There are thumbnails and direct links to the sites for your perusal. Look at these to get ideas on how you can start making your site more visually friendly.

When you are ready to start your redesign, head over to Heather Solomon’s house and start from the ground up.

Now you’ve got no excuse…

Top 100 Best Looking SharePoint Sites

EndUserSharePoint.com: Best Practices – Use short acronyms when creating names

Use short acronyms when creating names for sites, subsites, workspaces, lists,libraries,etc. Relabel them once they have been created.

Why? The URL string in SharePoint is limited to 260 characters. You can significantly decrease the character count by using acronyms. That’s the short version. You can read more about URL string limitations at the Lois & Clark site.

EndUserSharePoint.com: Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards – The Video Wall Module

On Demand ScreenCastA fifth module has been added to the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards screencast series. You will have to scroll in the display interface to view the new module.

The Content Editor web part is the jack of all trades when it comes to creating interesting content display in WSS. This module, The Video Wall, shows how it is possible to create a simple, image based interface for presenting videos.

Five (5) modules are now available in the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards series, for a total of 25 minutes of content. I would appreciate it if you would spread the word by embedding the video player on your site. Thanks. — Mark

Current Modules in Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards:

  1. Overview
  2. Graphics Menu
  3. Random Quote Generator
  4. My Task Assignments
  5. The Video Wall

This is a continuing series of screencast based upon the online workshop, Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards, given on September 16, 2008.

I will be offering a hands-on, live online workshop to actually implement each of the solutions in your WSS or MOSS environment. The workshop will include preconfigured web parts, resources for implementation and a SharePoint sandbox for testing out the solutions.

Keep and eye on the Weekly Newsletter for announcement of the workshop.

EndUserSharePoint.com: Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards – My Task Assignments Module

On Demand ScreenCastA fourth module has been added to the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards screencast series.

WSS web parts do not include graphing, charting or KPI capabilities. This module, My Task Assignments, demonstrates a possible way to create visual representations within a calculated column of a task list. It was one of the most popular demos in the live presentation.

This is a continuing series of screencast based upon the online workshop, Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards, given on September 16, 2008.

I will be offering a hands-on, live online workshop to actually implement each of the solutions in your WSS or MOSS environment. The workshop will include preconfigured web parts, resources for implementation and a SharePoint sandbox for testing out the solutions.

Keep and eye on the Weekly Newsletter for announcement of the workshop.

EndUserSharePoint.com: Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards – Random Quote Generator Module

On Demand ScreenCastA third module has been added to the Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards screencast series. Creating a Random Quote Generator walks through an overview of how to use a Content Editor web part to embed javascript and a list of quotes. When the page reloads, a new quote is shown each time.

This is a continuing series of screencast based upon the online workshop, Case Studies in SharePoint Dashboards, given on September 16, 2008.

I will be offering a hands-on, live online workshop to actually implement each of the solutions in your WSS or MOSS environment. The workshop will include preconfigured web parts, resources for implementation and a SharePoint sandbox for testing out the solutions.

Keep and eye on the Weekly Newsletter for announcement of the workshop.

EndUserSharePoint.com: Extending Issues and Tasks: Part 1

The Challenge

This question came from the Stump the Panel forum:

“How do I create a link between Issues and Tasks? I want to be able to create an issue and then subsequently create one or more tasks for that issue. I then would like to be able to view an issue and see the tasks associated with it. I would also like not to be able to close an issue unless all its tasks are complete.” –rradan

First, I want to explain we can accomplish this many ways, but I will demonstrate my way. My way may not work for everyone but it will work for people using MOSS (standard or higher) with little or no use of proprietary tools (like SPD). So, let’s get started.

Part 1: Breaking It Down

Linking Lists

First, we need to “create a link between Issues and Tasks.” Using core SharePoint functionality, we need to create a Lookup Site Column based on Issues. To make the Lookup Site Column, we need to have something to look up. And since we like to follow best practice, we’ll make our own, child versions of Issue and Task.

Create Content Type: Company Issue

At the site collection level, go to Site Actions > Site Settings > Modify All Site Settings. Under the Galleries heading, click “Site content types.” Click Create. Enter the information below and click OK.

Name

Company* Issue

Description

Use to document an issue.

Parent Content Type

List Content Types/Issue

New Group

Company* List Content Types

*replace Company with your organization’s name.

Configure Tracking List: Issues

At the Site Collection level, go to Site Actions > View All Site Content. Click Create. Under Tracking, click Issue Tracking. Name the list “Issues” and click Create. On the List’s default view, open the Settings menu and choose List Settings. Under General Settings, click Advanced Settings.

Set “Allow management of content types?” to Yes, and then click OK. Under Content Types, click Issue then click “Delete this content type.” Click “Add from existing site content types” and choose Company List Content Types > Company Issue, and then click OK.

Navigate back to your Issues list’s default view and add test data (at least two issues where the second one references the first as a Related Issue). Now we have issues that our Tasks can roll up to.

Create Content Type: Company Task

At the site collection level, go to Site Actions > Site Settings > Modify All Site Settings. Under the Galleries heading, click “Site content types.” Click Create. Enter the information below and click OK.

Name

Company* Task

Description

Use to document a task.

Parent Content Type

List Content Types/Task

New Group

Company* List Content Types

*replace Company with your organization’s name.

Click “Add from new site column.” Enter the information below and click OK.

Column Name

LookupIssue*

Type

Lookup

New Group

Lookup Columns

Description

Link item to a Company Issue from the Issues list.

Get information from

Issues

In this column

Title

* When you first name a column, do not use spaces. Once created, you can edit the name to make it more readable

Optional: If you want to make the lookup column required, click the column’s name and change the “This column is:” option to Required, and then click OK. To add the space in your column name, click on the column’s name again and click “Edit site column in new window,” make the change to the name, and then click OK and close the new window. You can also change the order of the columns here which changes how the Data Form Web Part (new, edit, and display pages) displays them by clicking “Column order.”

Configure Tracking List: Tasks

At the Site Collection level, go to Site Actions > View All Site Content. Click Create (or if your template already has a Tasks list, click the list’s name). Under Tracking, click Tasks. Name the list “Tasks” and click Create. On the List’s default view, open the Settings menu and choose List Settings. Under General Settings, click Advanced Settings.

Set “Allow management of content types?” to Yes, and then click OK. Under Content Types, click Task then click “Delete this content type” (if you are using an existing Tasks list, you cannot delete yet). Click “Add from existing site content types” and choose Company List Content Types > Company Task, and then click OK. If you have tasks in an existing list, you can either delete them or change their content type to the new one you just added. To change the content type, edit the item and you will notice a new field at the top of the form, called “Content Type.” After you remove all instances of the original content type, you can remove it from your list’s settings.

Stay tuned for the next installment when we work on “view an issue and see the tasks associated with it.”